Peter Frie

(1947–)
Peter Frie's paintings do not depict particular places, but rather are an invented fusion of different scenes and emotions he has witnessed at various times and in various places, which he later recollects in his studio. This idea that we are looking at the representation of memory is often enhanced by portions of unpainted canvas which he leaves around his landscapes. The scenes he paints therefore hover somewhere between the real and unreal, just like the sudden flash of remembrance. It is this rendering of 'inner' or psychological space which makes Frie's work so captivating and contemporary.


Frie has exhibited throughout Europe including in Freiburg, Zurich and Stockholm. In 2002 the New Art Centre gallery displayed his exhibition 'Visiting', in which the inspiration for his paintings was taken from the Wiltshire countryside that surrounds Roche Court. For 'Path' (2017), his first exhibition in the UK for six years, Peter Frie has created a series of beautiful new paintings and sculptures especially for the New Art Centre.


Frie was born in 1947 in Lysekil, Sweden. He lives and works in Båstad and on Phuket. Examples of his work are in a number of major public collections including the Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Kiasma Museum of Modern Art, Helsinki; and the Malmö Museum, Malmö, as well as private collections across Europe. Frie has exhibited in solo and group exhibitions across Europe and the USA, most recently at the VIDA Museum & Konsthall, Borgholm, Sweden and last showed at the New Art Centre in 2011. In 1998 he was awarded the Ars Fennica, the prestigious prize awarded by the Henna and Pertti Niemistö Art Foundation.